Lachlan passed away in January 2010.  As a memorial, this site remains as he left it.
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Welcome to Lachlan Cranswick's Personal Homepage in Melbourne, Australia

Lachlan's London, UK 2001 Web Journal

A Scenic Route to get from South Kensington to Birkbeck College, Bloomsbury, London - 18th August 2001 - 3 of 4

Statue of Dr Edward Jenner near the Italian Fountains, Kensington Gardens

Lachlan's Homepage is at http://lachlan.bluehaze.com.au

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Letter from Thomas Jefferson

3rd president of the United States: 1801-1809

Letter To Dr. Edward Jenner On his Discovery of the Small 
 Pox Vaccine - Monticello, May 14, 1806

        _To Dr. Edward Jenner_
        _Monticello, May 14, 1806_


        SIR, -- I have received a copy of the evidence at large
respecting the discovery of the vaccine inoculation which you have
been pleased to send me, and for which I return you my thanks.
Having been among the early converts, in this part of the globe, to
its efficiency, I took an early part in recommending it to my
countrymen.  I avail myself of this occasion of rendering you a
portion of the tribute of gratitude due to you from the whole human
family.  Medicine has never before produced any single improvement of
such utility.  Harvey's discovery of the circulation of the blood was
a beautiful addition to our knowledge of the animal economy, but on a
review of the practice of medicine before and since that epoch, I do
not see any great amelioration which has been derived from that
discovery.  You have erased from the calendar of human afflictions
one of its greatest.  Yours is the comfortable reflection that
mankind can never forget that you have lived.  Future nations will
know by history only that the loathsome small-pox has existed and by
you has been extirpated.

        Accept my fervent wishes for your health and happiness and
assurances of the greatest respect and consideration.


Sequence of Events

Image

Description

The Italian Gardens The Italian Gardens

  • The Italian Gardens
  • The Italian Gardens

The Italian Fountains - statue of Dr Edward Jenner is visible Italian Fountains and statue of Dr Edward Jenner

  • The Italian Fountains - statue of Dr Edward Jenner is visible
  • Italian Fountains and statue of Dr Edward Jenner

Italian Fountains Statue of Dr Edward Jenner

  • Italian Fountains
  • Statue of Dr Edward Jenner

Statue of Dr Edward Jenner Statue of Dr Edward Jenner

  • Statue of Dr Edward Jenner
  • Statue of Dr Edward Jenner

Plaque to Dr Edward Jenner Plaque to Dr Edward Jenner

  • Plaque to Dr Edward Jenner

    Edward Jenner MD FRS
    1749 - 1823
    Country Doctor Who Benefited Mankind

    In Jenner's time smallpox was a dreaded disease worldwide and caused many deaths particularly on children. Survivors were left badly scarred and often blinded or deformed.
    In 1796 Jenner vaccinated James Phipps with cowpox and showed that the boy was then immune to smallpox. He predicted the worldwide erradication of smallpox. This was achieved in 1980.
    Jenner was born, practiced and died in Berkeley Gloucestershire and studied at St. George's Hospital, London.
    This statue by William Calder Marshall, RA was inaugurated by Prince Albert, the Prince Consort and was the first to be errected in Kensington Gardens in 1862. The cost was met by international subscription.

    This plaque was funded and placed here by the Friends of Hyde Park and Kensington Gardens,
    The Jenner Educational Trust and
    St. George Hospital Medical School in 1996
    the Bicentennial Anniversary of Jenner's discovery.

  • Plaque to Dr Edward Jenner

Plaque to Dr Edward Jenner The Italian Fountains

  • Plaque to Dr Edward Jenner
  • The Italian Fountains

The Italian Fountains Statue of Dr Edward Jenner

  • The Italian Fountains
  • Statue of Dr Edward Jenner

You are here in Kensington Gardens Exit from Kensington Gardens to Lancaster Gate Tube Station

  • You are here in Kensington Gardens
  • Exit from Kensington Gardens to Lancaster Gate Tube Station

Lancaster Gate Tube Station Lancaster Gate Tube Station

  • Lancaster Gate Tube Station
  • Lancaster Gate Tube Station



Poetry Links and stuff

Lines Written in Kensington Gardens
(Matthew Arnold, 1822-1888)

In this lone, open glade I lie,
Screen'd by deep boughs on either hand;
And at its end, to stay the eye,
Those black-crown'd, red-boled pine-trees stand!

Birds here make song, each bird has his,
Across the girdling city's hum.
How green under the boughs it is!
How thick the tremulous sheep-cries come!

Sometimes a child will cross the glade
To take his nurse his broken toy;
Sometimes a thrush flit overhead
Deep in her unknown day's employ.

Here at my feet what wonders pass,
What endless, active life is here!
What blowing daisies, fragrant grass!
An air-stirr'd forest, fresh and clear.

Scarce fresher is the mountain-sod
Where the tired angler lies, stretch'd out,
And, eased of basket and of rod,
Counts his day's spoil, the spotted trout.

In the huge world, which roars hard by,
Be others happy if they can!
But in my helpless cradle I
Was breathed on by the rural Pan.

I, on men's impious uproar hurl'd,
Think often, as I hear them rave,
That peace has left the upper world
And now keeps only in the grave.

Yet here is peace for ever new!
When I who watch them am away,
Still all things in this glade go through
The changes of their quiet day.

Then to their happy rest they pass!
The flowers upclose, the birds are fed,
The night comes down upon the grass,
The child sleeps warmly in his bed.

Calm soul of all things! make it mine
To feel, amid the city's jar,
That there abides a peace of thine,
Man did not make, and cannot mar.

The will to neither strive nor cry,
The power to feel with others give!
Calm, calm me more! nor let me die
Before I have begun to live.

Dover Beach
(Matthew Arnold, 1822-1888)

The sea is calm to-night,
The tide is full, the moon lies fair
Upon the straits; -- on the French coast the light
Gleams and is gone; the cliffs of England stand,
Glimmering and vast, out in the tranquil bay.
Come to the window, sweet is the night-air!
Only, from the long line of spray
Where the sea meets the moon-blanch'd land,
Listen! you hear the grating roar
Of pebbles which the waves draw back, and fling,
At their return, up the high strand,
Begin, and cease, and then again begin,
With tremulous cadence slow, and bring
The eternal note of sadness in.

Sophocles long ago
Heard it on the Aegean, and it brought
Into his mind the turbid ebb and flow
Of human misery; we
Find also in the sound a thought,
Hearing it by this distant northern sea.
The sea of faith
Was once, too, at the full, and round earth's shore
Lay like the folds of a bright girdle furl'd.
But now I only hear
Its melancholy, long, withdrawing roar,
Retreating, to the breath
Of the night-wind, down the vast edges drear
And naked shingles of the world.

Ah, love, let us be true
To one another! for the world which seems
To lie before us like a land of dreams,
So various, so beautiful, so new,
Hath really neither joy, nor love, nor light,
Nor certitude, nor peace, nor help for pain;
And we are here as on a darkling plain
Swept with confused alarms of struggle and flight,
Where ignorant armies clash by night.

London, MDCCCII
(William Wordsworth, 1770-1850)

O friend! I know not which way I must look
For comfort, being as I am, opprest
to think that now our life is only drest
For show; mean handiwork of craftsman, cook,

Or groom! - We must run glittering like a brook
In the open sunshine, or we are unblest;
The wealthiest man among us is the best:
No grandeur now in Nature or in book

Delights us. Rapine, avarice, expense,
This is idolatry; and these we adore:
Plain living and high thinking are no more:

The homely beauty of the good old cause
Is gone; our peace, our fearful innocence,
And pure religion breathing household laws.

London
(William Blake, 1757-1827)

I wandered through each chartered street,
Near where the chartered Thames does flow,
A mark in every face I meet,
Marks of weakness, marks of woe.

In every cry of every man,
In every infant's cry of fear,
In every voice, in every ban,
The mind-forged manacles I hear:

How the chimney-sweeper's cry
Every blackening church appals,
And the hapless soldier's sigh
Runs in blood down palace-walls.

But most, through midnight streets I hear
How the youthful harlot's curse
Blasts the new-born infant's tear,
And blights with plagues the marriage-hearse.

Upon Westminster Bridge
(Sept. 3, 1802)
(William Wordsworth, 1770-1850)

Earth has not anything to show more fair:
Dull would he be of soul who could pass by
A sight so touching in its majesty:
This City now doth like a garment wear

The beauty of the morning: silent, bare,
Skips, towers, domes, theatres, and temples lie
Open unto the fields, and to the sky,
All bright and glittering in the smokeless air.

Never did sun more beatifully steep
In his first splendour valley, rock or hill;
Ne'er saw I, never felt, a calm so deep!

The river glideth at this own sweet will:
Dear God! the very houses seem asleep;
And all that mighty heart is lying still!


[Back to Lachlan's Homepage] | [What's New]
[Index to Lachlan's London, UK 2001 Web Journal]
Scenic way to South Kensington to Birkbeck : [1 of 4] | [2 of 4] | [3 of 4] | [4 of 4]

[Intro - CranClan] . . [Happening Things] . . [The Daresbury Laboratory Web Ring of Life] . . [NCS - Non-Competitive Scrabble] . . [Garden Gnomes of Daresbury Laboratory] . . [Nature and Local UK Things] . . [USA 2001 and LDEO Columbia University] . . [Historical Literature/Poetry] . . [Music] . . [Misc Things] . . [DL SRS Status] . . [Conference and Travel Things] . . [The Wonders of Team Building] . . [Other People's Homepages] . . [Crystallographic Internet Front] . . [While in Melbourne] . . [Semi Relevant Links]
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